gradnessmadness:

This article talks about how advisors can help a grad student who’s become stuck/stymied in the writing process.  I found it useful from a student standpoint as well.  I would also recommend reading the comments at the bottom; there’s some good stuff there.

http://tinyurl.com/9r5nq87

Grad school.

(Source: disneyfilm)

positivelypersistentteach:

Dear Tumblrverse,

Before the explanation part of this post, I need to say this so it will be in posts that are shortened by a reblog: More than anything I ask that you reblog this post so that kind millionaires more people will see it and more support can be…

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

bookriot:

Ever had to move with a ton of books?

Here are 8 tips for making it a little easier.

"Man came silently into the world. As a matter of fact he trod so softly that, when we first catch sight of him as revealed by those indestructible stone instruments, we find him sprawling all over the old world from the Cape of Good Hope to Peking. Without doubt he already speaks and lives in groups; he already makes fire…. Thus, in the eyes of science, which at long range can only see things in bulk, the ‘first man’ is and can only be a crowd, and his infancy is made up of thousands and thousands of years…."
Teilhard de Chardin, in The Phenomenon of Man (via beingblog)
thegetty:

What can you hear at the museum?
Artist Elana Mann creates participatory sonic experiences and invites you to listen in. More on the Iris.
How do sounds change depending on your body position, your direction, your eyes open or closed, or the position of the histophone? 
Can you imagine sounds coming from the art, architecture, and gardens?
If a sculpture could speak, what would it say? 
What are sounds you can make with your own body? 
Can you hear the tectonic plates shifting underneath your feet? 
How are natural and man-made sounds mixing and blending in this environment? 
A list of the sounds that have reverberated through my body, 2013, Elana Mann. Cut photographs on paper. 
thegetty:

What can you hear at the museum?
Artist Elana Mann creates participatory sonic experiences and invites you to listen in. More on the Iris.
How do sounds change depending on your body position, your direction, your eyes open or closed, or the position of the histophone? 
Can you imagine sounds coming from the art, architecture, and gardens?
If a sculpture could speak, what would it say? 
What are sounds you can make with your own body? 
Can you hear the tectonic plates shifting underneath your feet? 
How are natural and man-made sounds mixing and blending in this environment? 
A list of the sounds that have reverberated through my body, 2013, Elana Mann. Cut photographs on paper. 
thegetty:

What can you hear at the museum?
Artist Elana Mann creates participatory sonic experiences and invites you to listen in. More on the Iris.
How do sounds change depending on your body position, your direction, your eyes open or closed, or the position of the histophone? 
Can you imagine sounds coming from the art, architecture, and gardens?
If a sculpture could speak, what would it say? 
What are sounds you can make with your own body? 
Can you hear the tectonic plates shifting underneath your feet? 
How are natural and man-made sounds mixing and blending in this environment? 
A list of the sounds that have reverberated through my body, 2013, Elana Mann. Cut photographs on paper. 

thegetty:

What can you hear at the museum?

Artist Elana Mann creates participatory sonic experiences and invites you to listen in. More on the Iris.

  • How do sounds change depending on your body position, your direction, your eyes open or closed, or the position of the histophone? 
  • Can you imagine sounds coming from the art, architecture, and gardens?
  • If a sculpture could speak, what would it say? 
  • What are sounds you can make with your own body? 
  • Can you hear the tectonic plates shifting underneath your feet? 
  • How are natural and man-made sounds mixing and blending in this environment? 

A list of the sounds that have reverberated through my body, 2013, Elana Mann. Cut photographs on paper. 

(Source: teen-wolf)

sdzoo:

Scientists explain the orangutan’s unique approach to problem solving with this example: If a chimpanzee is given an oddly shaped peg and several different holes to try to put it in, the chimp immediately tries shoving the peg in various holes until it finds the correct hole. But an orangutan may stare off into space or even scratch itself with the peg. Then, after a while, it offhandedly sticks the peg into the correct hole while looking at something else that has caught its interest.

Photo by Bob Worthington